Monthly Archives: August 2017

What You Should Do If Your Computer Can not Start

1. No Access to the Keyboard During the Boot Process?

Help, I can’t access my keyboard at boot!

If this is the case, I would recommend:

1-1. If using a USB keyboard, plug the keyboard into the primary USB ports on the back of the computer (on the motherboard). Restart the computer and try again.

1-2. Try another known working USB keyboard plugged into the primary USB ports on the back of the computer (on motherboard). Restart the computer and try again.

1-3. Try another known working PS/2 keyboard, restart the computer and try again.

1-4. If using a PS/2 Keyboard, try replacing your keyboard with a USB keyboard, restart the computer and try again.

1-5. If these steps fail, remove your keyboard connection and shut the computer off with the power button. While computer is off, plug the keyboard back into the computer and start the computer.

Still doesn’t work? Please go to “I need to flash my bios” section and proceed with flashing your bios.

2. Does Your Computer Freeze at Bios?

Why is my computer frozen?!

2-1. Remove all devices from your computer including removable hard drives, additional USB devices, and printers and faxes. Restart the computer and try again. If no result, go to step 2-2.

2-2. If you can see your bios screen, please tap the key to go into your bios settings. While inside of bios, make sure that your hard drive, memory and video card ( is applicable) are detected. If it is not, try re-seating or replacing the unit that is not being detected. If no result, go to step 2-3.

2-3. While looking in bios and all of your hardware is getting detected okay, please reset the bios back to its default settings and choose “save and quit.” The computer will restart and you should be looking at the operating system loading page at this point. If no result, go to step 2-4.

2-4. Open the computer, remove all but 1 memory module (usually closest to the CPU) and disconnect all hard drives. Also disconnect and PCI or AGP add on cards and start your computer. If you see “operating system not found” or a similar message, progress has been made. Then start adding back 1 item at a time, restarting the computer after each item to see when it fails.

If these steps still won’t work, please proceed to the “I need to flash my bios” section.

3. Computer Beeping Noises on Power Up

No data on screen and computer yelling at you?

3-1. If your computer is beeping at start up and you are not seeing anything on your screen. There is a hardware problem with your computer. Please check your motherboard or computer manufacturers website for bios code meanings. If this is not possible, first thing to try is remove all sticks of memory except for one, restart your computer and try again. If no result, please go to step 3-2.

3-2. If removed and tested all memory, please disconnect all internal connections EXCEPT for Power supply connections, Video card connections and the Power switch (PSW). Also leaving 1 stick of memory, heatsinks and fans plugged in as well, restart the computer and try again. If no result, please go to step 3-3.

3-3. If you have a video card installed and have on-board video as well, please remove the video card and the power connection to that card. Hook the video cable to your on board video connection. Restart your computer and try again. If no result, go to step 3-4.

3-4. If the beeping still exists, Try replacing the memory with a known working module. Restart the computer and try again, if no result, please replace the motherboard and try again. If still no result, go to step 3-5.

3-5. If beeping still exists, replace the processor and add only the necessary connections ( Power supply connections, Video card connections and the Power switch (PSW). Also leaving 1 stick of memory, heatsinks and fans plugged in as well ). Start the computer and try again.

Note: If all steps do not work, please review the steps one more time, if the computer is still beeping at start up, please contact a local computer repair technician.

4. Windows Was Unable to Start?

unmountable volume, windows did not start successfully?

4-1. First you should try “start Windows normally.” If this does not bring you back into Windows, move to step 4-2.

4-2. Choose the “Use last known good configuration”, you should be able to boot back into Windows at this point, if not proceed to step 4-3.

4-3. Choose “Repair” as an option and let the computer go through it’s motions, your computer may restart a couple of times in the process. You should now be able to get back in to Windows, if not please proceed to step 4-4.

4-4. You will need to boot from a Windows installation DVD or boot-able USB with the installation files on it. Make sure to press the adequate key at bios to view / change boot options. Boot the DVD / USB, choose repair and then choose your Windows installation directory. If prompted with a command prompt, type “chkdsk /r” and then press enter. If no result, move to step 4-5.

4-5. If another computer is available, please remove the hard drive from the affected computer, insert the hard drive into the working computer as a slave ( making the proper jumper configuration change on the primary and slave drive). Then boot into Windows using your known working hard drive, then try and recover as much personal data as possible and store it on the known working hard drive. If another computer is unavailable or this does not work for you, please proceed to step 4-6.

4-6. Attach a removable storage medium ( removable hard drive ) Boot to a recovery software utility or Live CD using your DVD drive or USB drive. A few of these utilities are Hiren’s Boot CD, Ultimate Boot CD, Knoppix and Ubuntu. Access your hard drive from this utility and back up all of your personal files and information. Then safely remove your removable hard drive, restart your computer and hit F11 or ctrl + F11 repeatedly if you have a factory installed windows recovery partition. Or if you have a DVD Windows installation disc insert this disc at start up. Choose the “install” option and install over your old broken Windows installation.

Note: If the above will not work, please contact a local computer repair technician.

5. I Need to Flash My Bios!

Bios corrupted, acting strange?

5-1. Obtain your bios compatible files. Most of the time, you can get these files from the manufacturer’s website. Just search for the files on their website using your model # of you computer or service tag.

5-2. Create a boot-able floppy drive with your bios files. Then manually copy the bios files onto the floppy drive, eject the floppy drive and insert it into the troubled computer and start the computer up. Press the specific key to access your boot menu when the computer is starting up, choose your floppy drive. If everything goes to plan, you should see a command prompt. Follow your manufacturers instructions on how to flash the bios. If you do not have a floppy drive, proceed to 5-3.

5-3. Create a boot-able USB with your bios files on it. One utility to get this job done would be HP’s USB Storage Format Tool. Then manually copy the bios files onto the USB drive, eject the USB drive and insert it into the troubled computer and start the computer up. Press the specific key to access your boot menu when the computer is starting up, choose your USB drive. If everything goes to plan, you should see a command prompt. Follow your manufacturers instructions on how to flash the bios. If you do not have a USB drive, proceed to 5-4.

5-4. Create a boot-able DVD with your bios files on it. When making your iso, copy the bios files into the ISO before compiling. Burn the DVD, eject the DVD and insert it into the troubled computer and start the computer up. Press the specific key to access your boot menu when the computer is starting up. Choose your DVD drive. If everything goes to plan, you should see a command prompt. Follow your manufacturers instructions on how to flash the bios.

Why You Got Eyestrain and The Need for Computer Eyewear

Computer eyestrain is the number one office-related health complaint in the U.S., with some 60 million Americans suffering from computer eyestrain according to the American Optometric Association. Computer use at work and home continues to grow exponentially. Computer use is associated with a number of visual and physical symptoms experienced by 50%-90% of all computer users. So, if you have experienced fatigue, headache, eye strain, blurred vision, dry or irritated eyes and neck or back aches at the computer it is possible that you are suffering just some of the symptoms called Computer Vision Syndrome (CVS). Solving the symptoms of CVS requires a visit to your eye doctor to determine if you need corrective lenses while working at the computer, especially if your computer use is two or more hours a day. The reason for computer vision related problems is further explained with a simplified description of how the eye and brain processes visual information.

Working at a computer is more visually demanding than doing other standard office work such as reading printed documents. Human vision is not designed for staring into a computer screen. Your eyes require constant sharp edged images like the characters found on ink and paper to process and focus on comfortably. The eye system of lens focusing is referred to as accommodation. Computer images are made up of tiny round dots, known as pixels. Since your eye cannot focus on the tiny round pixels, you must constantly refocus or accommodate to keep the images sharp. The eyes can’t keep a constant relaxed focus on the computer screen, even when you increased the number of pixels per square or max out the computer’s refresh rate. The monitor is constantly being “redrawn”, and this eventually leads to repetitive stress of the eye muscles and fatigue.

Bifocals are not helpful at the computer. In fact, the bifocal only increases the problem since the reading portion of the bifocal is designed for a shorter distance than a computer screen and for a much lower visual angle. The tendency to lift the chin up and move closer to the screen just leads to lower back and neck problems. Progressive lenses (eyeglasses without bifocal lines) have the same shortfalls since the area for intermediate computer vision is found in the lower half of the glasses and the area for viewing is limited.

If you spend two or more hours working at the computer CVS can be a real problem at home or in the workplace. Savvy employers are beginning to recognize that increase work production can be realized with eyewear designed for computer use. Visit your eye doctor who is ready to help you eliminate the problems of Computer Vision Syndrome with a dedicated pair of computer glasses. You can benefit from a natural head and neck position with computer glasses or the new ergonomically designed clip-on computer reading glasses.

You can choose to have a dedicated pair of computer glasses custom made or you may be wondering how to convert your existing general purpose pair of eyeglasses that you use for distance and reading only into computer glasses. Well, there is an easy and affordable way by using a new innovative clip-on lens to view a computer monitor. Simply clipping the lens on to the bridge portion of your general wear eyeglasses that you are already wearing, and you can immediately feel and see the difference while working on a computer. Save your eyes from nagging eyestrain and improve your ability to be productive in the workplace as well. A pair of dedicated computer glasses or the new clip-on computer reading glass will do much for you in all aspects of work, as well as and make you a feel better outside of work since they will eliminate much of the eyestrain, lower back discomfort and neck pains that you are experiencing.

tips on How to Build Selection on Computers and Components

I get asked the same question very often, how to build a computer? It can be very deceiving to the average person’s eyes when they glance into an open computer. There are different “pieces” to be found and quite a few wires running around from one part to the next. All of this can be quite confusing and discouraging. The best advice I can give is that it looks more complicated that what it actually is. Don’t be afraid to do some trial and error to figure things out, within reason. Of course you have to be careful and not force components in spots they do not belong, but it is difficult to mix up as most things can only go one way, and will only fit in the correct location. Over the years it is how I learned most of what I do today, trial and error. One something goes wrong, there is always a way to fix it, and sometimes it just takes some patience and research to figure out a way to fix the problem.

I started building computers around 1996, when I was ten years old, and it became a hobby of mine which led into a business about 16 months ago. Over the years there has been a lot to learn and pick up on, and that is the thing with technology and computers. Computers are always changing and updating for more performance, reliably, smaller size, ease of use and less energy consumption in more recent years to become “green” on the environment.

But that is enough with the history, it is now time to move onto the actual computer building process from start to finish. There is quite a bit to cover and there are many ways to go about the process, but I will share my personal views and opinions along the way.

To start things off you have to ask yourself what you want the computer for. It could be a basic machine for simple web browsing, such as Facebook and E-mail. Another need could be simply for a media center, a computer hooked up with an entertainment center for movie watching purposes, music, recording, and internet television as well as any other uses hooked up to a television full time. The machine may be used primarily for gaming. A gaming computer can be a touchy subject as everyone’s views are different. Some may just be happy with playing a game on lower setting, and others may want everything turned up to the max with room to spare for future game titles. The final use I will touch into would be photo and video editing. A lot of times a high end gaming computer, and a photo/video editing machine will have many similarities. You do not necessarily have to have an extremely powerful system for videos and photos, but it will certainly cut down on the time required. If someone is looking to produce lengthy videos, it could take ages to accomplish on a less powerful computer. One thing I will say is no matter what you are looking to build a computer for, figure out a budget of available funds and go from there. There is no sense in looking at very costly premium components, when there is just no budget for it. Many would be quite surprised at how inexpensive a fairly powerful system can be “now days.” I never recommend to buy the latest and greatest as it will cost a premium and will be replaced by something better in around six months’ time. That is just how the computer world works.

Once the purpose of the computer and a budget is planned out, there are a handful of main components that are required to assemble a fully functional computer. These core components include;

The chassis which houses and protects all of the components,

The power supply (PSU) which supplies power to the computer from the wall,

Motherboard which is the central location for all the components to communicate with each other,

Graphics card, which is responsible for putting an image on your computer screen that you can see and interact with,

Processor (CPU) which functions as the brains of the operation, calculating millions of operations every second,

Memory (RAM) which stores temporary information calculated by the processor for fast access,

Hard drive, or hard disk which is the permanent storage device, holding all of the user’s data and programs,

Removable storage such as CD/DVD/Blu-Ray readers and burners, USB drives and other storage devices.

The first component we will start with is the motherboard. This is pretty much the central location where everything plugs into. The motherboard is full of “highways” which pass data between all the components. There are many kinds of motherboards available, most commonly there are AMD and Intel based boards. An AMD bases motherboard must be matched with an AMD processor and vice versa. An Intel based motherboard with an Intel processor. There are also different form factors, or sizes available, which must be matched with a proper case for a proper fit. Most commonly there are Micro ATX, ATX, Extended ATX, and more recently Mini ITX which is of a very small size for when space is extremely limited, such as in an entertainment center. There are also other sizes available but these are the most common platforms I deal with. The computer case chosen must be compatible with the size of the motherboard, if the motherboard is an ATX form factor, the case has to support an ATX size. Another main factor to take into consideration is the type of socket. The processor (CPU) mounts onto the motherboard and the socket must be the same. Both AMD and Intel have their own sockets and naming schemes. For example a modern Intel machine may be a socket 1155, and AMD machine may be an AM3 socket. So if the motherboard is an 1155 board the CPU must also be an 1155. Just be sure to do your research and make sure that the chosen CPU and motherboard are compatible with each other. It is worth noting that a CPU cannot be returned after purchase unless it is defective. So a mistake pairing up an incorrect CPU with a motherboard would not be a good thing to happen

The processor or CPU is a small chip made of silicon wafers that calculates millions of numbers extremely fast. In the computer world everything is a binary system which is made up of ones and zeros. Different combinations result in different things. The CPU is usually referred to as the brains of the computer. On modern Intel processors the contact side contains a large amount of pads which make contact with pins on the motherboard socket. AMD is the opposite having the pins on the CPU itself, and the pads on the motherboard. Quite a few years ago, Intel also had the pins on the CPU but that changed over the years. I remember having bent pins and straightening them out with a tiny pointy object. That would be very hard to do now days as there can be in excess of over 1,000 pins in close proximity to each other.

A processor makes a significant amount of heat, and needs something to keep the temperatures under control. Otherwise in a matter of seconds under a lot of work, a CPU would “burn” itself up and become a paperweight. In most cases a heat sink and a cooling fan will accomplish this task. A thin layer of thermal compound is applied in between the surface of the processor and the heat sink to optimally unload heat. A heat sink will usually be made up of several cooling fins which are then cooled by a fan blowing air across. Many retail boxed AMD and Intel processors will come with a stock cooling solution which is sufficient for the average user. The manufacturer will not sell a cooler along with their product that is not adequate. An aftermarket cooler may be chosen for less fan noise, or for those who like to push their computers passed the manufactures settings, which creates more heat, resulting in a higher performing cooling unit.

In more extreme cases, there may be liquid cooling or sometimes called water cooling. Technically water should not be used as it is conductive and will create corrosion over time without proper additives. In a water cooling setup, there will still be a block attached to the top of the processor, which allows liquid to pass through the inside and keep it cool. There will then be a radiator just like an automobile, and a fan(s) to cool the liquid as it passes through the radiator with the use of a pump.

Next, we will move onto the memory (RAM). RAM stands for random access memory. It is used to temporarily store data and will lose all stored data upon power loss. Memory is very fast and is right in line with the processor to quickly pass data back and forth to be calculated. Memory comes in different forms as well. On most modern computers, the type of memory being required is DDR3. There are different speeds which memory comes in and must be matched up with the chosen motherboard as well, just like the processor. Memory comes in various capacities. Different memory kits will have a varying number of modules and capacities. I would recommend either 8GB or 16GB of memory as it is in a very good price range this day and age. For a memory hungry video editing/photo editing machine, 16GB would come in very handy or possibly even 32GB if going all out!

For the graphics card there are several possibilities. Many times the chosen motherboard/CPU combination will have integrated on board video. Which means the graphics card is already built into the computer. No additional hardware would be needed. In some cases, a discrete graphics card can be used in conjunction with the on board video to further performance. In other situations there may be no integrated video at all and a graphics cards is required for the computer to function. Current graphics cards will occupy a PCI express slot (PCIe). AMD and their A series processors are a great solution currently for integrated graphics. They perform very well and are plenty for a general use computer and light duty gaming. For higher end gaming a dedicated graphics card will be needed, and if wanting some bragging rights, many modern day graphics cards can be paired up to work with each other. Sometimes two, three, or even four graphics cards to extreme gaming performance. But most likely if you are reading this, you would not be looking into that as it is fairly advanced and requires a fair amount of knowledge to master.

Next, we will move onto the power supply, which is responsible for taking the AC (alternating current) power from the outlet in the wall, and converting it into DC (direct current). The power supply or PSU (power supply unit) is another crucial component as without it, there is no juice to get the computer running. Power supplies come in different wattage’s and efficiency ratings. Recently the power requirements of computers have gone way down from what they were a couple of years ago. What once required a 1200 watt power supply can be accomplished with an 800 watt power supply on new hardware. Of course that is just an estimate I threw out there, but you get the idea. Many general use computers will be just fine somewhere along the lines of a 500 watt unit. It is always good to go a little bigger just to allow for expansion in the future. Depending on the chosen components, various amounts of power will be required. It is always best practice to get a decent, quality unit and not the cheapest one available. A cheap unit can actually cause problems in the future with “unclean” power and may not last for a decent length of time. A quality power supply should last for many years to come and may be reused in a future build as well. In most cases a standard ATX power supply with a 24 pin main power connector will do the job. There are other cables as well to take account for such as SATA, Molex, and 4/8 pin EPS connectors which supply modern motherboard with extra power that the 24 pin connector cannot provide.

Moving on the chassis to house the computer, there are many possibilities to choose from. There are so many designs to take into consideration and different sizes. Some may have an acrylic window on the side to see all of the components once they are inside. As noted above with motherboards, the case has to match up to support the correct form factor motherboard. Be it ATX or Extended ATX, or whatever else it may be. Same cases may just be plain and simple for a nice clean look, while others may be all futuristic with their design and flashy lights. It all comes down to personal preference and what the case has to offer. Good airflow is key to keeping all of the components cool and quiet. Cases can be customized with many different size fans featuring different air flows and noise levels, again depending on personal preference. A case will last for a very long time and can be reused in multiple computer builds. I prefer a full tower chassis for my personal computers as they allow plenty of space inside and upgrade ability to last for years and years to come.

Moving onto the hard drives, there are a couple different possibilities. This is the device that stores all the data and programs, even when power is turned off, unlike with memory or RAM. Many get the memory and hard drives confused when looking into computer purchases. They are not the same thing and come in completely different sizes. There are the traditional mechanical hard drives which are very cheap now days. The cost per Gigabyte is extremely low and they work great for large amount of storage room at a very good price. More recently we now have affordable SSD (solid state drive) solutions which have no mechanical moving parts and are much faster and more responsive then a tradition mechanical drive. An SSD makes for a much snappier system, and is one of the best upgrades that can happen for many modern computers. Computers are so fast now that traditional mechanical drives act as a bottleneck in many cases. This is where the computer system has to take a break and pause while it waits for the drive to gather its data and send it out. With an SSD this process is considerably faster, resulting in a much faster overall system. I tell many first time SSD users that they will be greatly amazed at the difference in the responsiveness of their computer after swapping out a mechanical drive for an SSD. The fallback to an SSD is that they come in much smaller capacities and the price per Gigabyte is much higher, even though it continues to drop. To get the best of both worlds, an SSD drive can be used to install the operating system onto, such as Windows, as well as frequently used programs. Then a mechanical drive can be used as well for tasks like less used programs, backups, and large files that would otherwise take up way too much space on an SSD.

In my opinion CD and DVD drives are starting to become a thing of the past. They like to fail and have read and write errors after a while and can be not so reliable at time. A successful computer can be build now days without even having an optical drive installed. Just about anything you could possibly need can be download from the internet or installed with a USB device such as a thumb or pen drive. These devices are much faster and more reliable, not to mention they can be erased and written to over and over again with different data and application. Sure there are re-writable CD/DVD/Blu-Ray drives, but it is just not nearly as practical or convenient in my opinion to other non-mechanical solutions. Personally I have a computer with all my programs and data on it, which can be accessed over the network where I can then pull all that information onto another computer and install and run those programs. No CD’s or thumb drives even needed. There are a lot of external storage options to choose from, external USB/eSATA hard drives can be a great solution for performing backups or moving data from one computer to another.

Learn Why Clips-On Reading Computer Glasses Are Not All Created Equal

Comparing the new Computer Conversion Clips, to several other clip-on computer reading glasses offered on internet discount sites, have resulted in findings that show significant optical and structural differences among the clips. These differences can dramatically affect the computer user both negatively and positively. You can learn to get more value for your dollar with the following information. The clip-on computer reading glasses were compared by design advantages such as size, shape, weight, and optical lens quality to allow for the best computer user experience. It was an easy comparison to make with the computer conversion clips design advantages providing the best choice to reduce, eye fatigue, eyestrain and increased physical comfort from neck and shoulder pain. What are clip-on computer reading glasses?

A clip-on computer reading glass provides additional magnification to be attached over the upper portion of the wearer’s eyeglasses, converting the distance prescription of general wear bifocals or progressive lenses to mid-range computer distance; this will allow the wearer to see a computer monitor clearly in the intermediate ranges between 18 to 30 inches more comfortably. The wearer will then be able to view intermediate distances, such as the computer screen, while maintaining a normal head position. This would eliminate having to elevate the chin while moving closer to the computer screen to see what is on the monitor more clearly while lifting the chin up to see through the bifocal portion of their glasses. Ideally, the clip-on should only cover the top part of the eyeglasses to allow the wearer to continue to use the lower reading portion of their eyeglasses to see near.

Eye Care Professionals, and even Chiropractors, are the chief means of providing these newly designed Computer Conversion Clips to the public. You won’t find the new clip-on’s at the local internet discount sites. The many design advantages of CCC’s makes the small cost difference a bargain. Eye care professionals and chiropractors alike understand and trust the digital design advantages of the CCC’s for their bifocal age patients who show signs of eyestrain or neck problems while working at the computer with general wear glasses for 2 or more hours a day. Computer users buy clip-on computer reading glasses because of convenience and cost savings.

The general cost of a dedicated pair of computer glasses will range from $175 – $350. The cost and quality of the eyeglass frames and lens types used for a intermediate computer focus and near vision accounts for the wide range in costs. Buying a computer reading type clip-on at your local internet site to clip to your general wear glasses for about $20, sounds like a great deal… until you learn about the design differences with the new Computer Conversion Clips. It is good to remember that most of the neural input that comes into our body is from our eyes, so vision is one sense that you should value. Here are some of the valued differences in Computer Conversion Clips verses the other clip-on computer reading glasses you can find on discount internet sites.

Quality Lens Materials: All the usual brands of clip-on’s sold on the internet are made of a polycarbonate material. Polycarbonate is lightweight and strong, but also scratches easier than most other plastics. Polycarbonate material also tends to yellow with age and UV exposure. About 10% of the eyewear population discovered seeing through polycarbonate material more difficult than seeing through other lens materials.

CCC’s are made of an acrylic material that is more scratch resistant than polycarbonate, and acrylic transmits more light through the lens medium than polycarbonate to the back of the eye. Motor cycle shields are made from this material as well as windows on submarines. Digital design optics with the acrylic material gives you high visual performance across the entire area of the lenses.

Anti-fatigue Designed Optics: All the usual brands of clip-on’s sold on the internet have a very wide spacing for the optical centers of the clip-on lens. This makes it harder for the eye muscles to maintain a comfortable focus on the computer screen for long periods of time. The eyes are forced to compensate for the wide optical centering by turning in, commonly called converging, a greater amount than usual to maintain stereopsis and reduce the possibility of any possible double vision.

CCC’s are designed by eye professionals to eliminate the extra work on your eye muscles that have to turn in or converge in more than normal when viewing a computer monitor. This attention to preferred optical centering, so the eye muscles don’t overwork, helps to minimize any unwanted eyestrain and eye muscle fatigue.

Non-glare Anti-reflection Coating: All the usual brands of clip-on’s sold on the internet usually don’t apply a mulit-layered coating process to eliminate glare and reflections on the lenses. This is a more costly process, and would be reflected in the cost to the consumer.

CCC’s come with a non-glare anti-reflection coating to reduce headaches from excessive glare and reflection. The anti-reflection coating improves vision with the resulting increase of light transmission traveling through the lens to the back of the eye. All of us that are bifocal age need more light, and this non-glare anti-reflection coating will increase light to the back of the eye by another 8 to 10%!

Important Size, Shape and Weight Considerations: All the usual brands of clip-on’s sold on the internet are all larger in size and weight. A possible reason for this is that these clips were designed when eyeglass sizes were larger some twenty years ago. The smallest size I found was 58 mm X 30 mm, and even this smaller clip-on still was too large a size for today’s eyewear, and weighed 40% more than the CCC. Unless you are comfortable with millimeter measurements you are not sure what the size really is when purchasing on the internet. Heavier clips have a dramatic effect on the center of gravity of eyeglasses, and consequently, help pull the frame down on your face with the extra weight. The larger sizes make it difficult for you to use the reading portion of your general wear glasses at a normal reading focus. The extra magnification over the bottom reading area means you will now need to hold reading material closer than usual. The clamping arms that secure the clip to the user’s lenses had a minimal rubber coating dipped onto the clamp tips to protect the eyeglass lenses from scratching when taking the device on and off.

CCC’s were designed to be made to cover only the upper distant portion of your general wear eyeglasses, and are as much as 48% lighter in weight than general wear clips. The lens measurements are 51 mm X 26 mm. This size works well even on light weight rimless eyeglasses. The reduced weight of the computer conversion clips help to keep your current eyeglasses up in place with less trouble. The shape and size design feature turns your general wear glasses, with the CCC’s attached, into a task specific computer and reading eyeglass for greater utility both on the computer or working in a cubicle. You can always flip-up the computer conversion clip to see clearly at distances over 20 feet. The clip-on clamps that secure the device to the user’s glasses have soft gripping boots on the tips of the clamps to prevent the device from accidentally scratching the eyeglass lenses when attaching or taking off the clip-on.

Bonus Benefits of CCC’s: Depending on the age of the individual Computer Conversion Clips come in two easy to understand dynamic powers from which to choose. A custom made crush proof case to protect the clip-on along with a micro-fiber cloth for cleaning is included. ECP’s can give you additional advice, or you can use the below resource box to find answers to any additional questions; along with access to other facts and questions the CCC’s comes with a money back guarantee.

Computer conversion clips have important design benefits that include lens material, digitally designed optics for better vision and anti-fatigue comfort, special anti-reflection coating for increase light transmission, as well as size, shape and weight advantages. See all you can see with improved ergonomics, dynamic power choices based on science, hard case for protection, and a solid guarantee. Don’t be fooled by price alone, not all clip-on computer glasses are equal. The right clip-on can make your work easier, so be informed, and work at the computer smarter.